Revision of Review of World Energy from Sun, 06/05/2011 - 19:45

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Review

Global economic recession drove energy consumption lower in 2009 – the first decline since 1982. As with the economic contraction, the decline in energy consumption was concentrated in OECD countries and the territory of the Former Soviet Union(FSU). Consumption of oil, natural gas and nuclear power declined, while coal consumption was essentially flat; only hydroelectric output and other renewable forms of energy increased in 2009. This data suggests global CO2 emissions from energy use fell for the first time since 1998.

Consumption

oil consumption

oil consumption

gas consumption

gas consumption

coal consumption

coal consumption

nuclear energy consumption

nuclear energy consumption

hydroelectricity consumption

hydroelectricity consumption

Proved Reserves

oil consumption

oil proved reserves

gas consumption

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coal consumption

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nuclear energy consumption

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hydroelectricity consumption

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World CO2 emissions from consumption of energy

World CO2 emissions

CO2 emissions by sector

CO2 emissions by sector

CO2 emissions, Germany

CO2 emissions, Germany

CO2 emissions, France

CO2 emissions, France

CO2 emissions, Russia

CO2 emissions, Russia

Possible sources of energy in the future

1.Transport system.
The new transport system has to be invented in the future.
RUF (Rapid, Urban, Flexible) consists of electric vehicles that can be operated both on the conventional street system and on a rail facility. The vehicles are called "dual-mode" vehicles because of this dual capability. They can be privately owned or owned and operated by the public for use by the general public. transport This overview is intended to provide a quick and illustrated description of a personal rapid transit technology now being developed in Denmark. RUF system